Mindy Hunt Mystery Stories

Publishers | Grossout and Dunfor | San Francisco

From digitalcomicmuseum.org via womenwriteaboutcomics.tumblr.com

From digitalcomicmuseum.org via womenwriteaboutcomics.tumblr.com

“It goes on like that. You know the job. You’re looking for narrative. Interrogate witnesses. Parsing evidence. Establish a timeline. Build a story. Day after day.”

– "Seeing Things," True Detective, written by Nic Pizzolatto; Season 1, Episode 2.

from Nancy Drew Mystery Stories #14: The Whispering Statue

from Nancy Drew Mystery Stories #14: The Whispering Statue

“In the first book of the series, Nancy has a blue roadster. Then, in ‘The Mysterious Letter” Nancy gets a new car – a smart maroon roadster. In ‘The Password to Larkspur Lane’ Mr. Drew tells Nancy he is giving her a new car, which makes the third one so far. The new car a beauty and handles marvelously. Powerful engine. A powerful black and green roadster. Even so, she rather hates to part with her maroon roadster.”

– excerpt from “Detailed Information and Data about Nancy Drew Herself;” quoted by Melanie Rehak, Girl Sleuth (2005)

1930, 1961 and 1968 covers for Nancy Drew Mystery Stories: The Secret of the Old Clock

1930, 1961 and 1968 covers for Nancy Drew Mystery Stories: The Secret of the Old Clock

Nancy, a true daughter of the Middle West, takes pride in the fertility of her State, and sees beauty in a crop of waving green corn as well as in the rolling hills and the expanse of prairie land.

Carson Drew [her father] finds it necessary to maintain a certain social position, and accordingly Nancy was frequently called upon to entertain noted professional men.

– excerpt from “Detailed Information and Data about Nancy Drew Herself;” quoted by Melanie Rehak, Girl Sleuth (2005)

The Case of the Witch Cat who Can Close Doors?

“Nancy has that intangible something, making one never forget her face. Pretty in a distinctive way. She speaks forcefully, but never thinks of thrusting her opinions on others. In any crowd she unconsciously assumes leadership. Sometimes her father calls her “Curly Locks. She is the apple of her eye.”

– excerpt from “Detailed Information and Data about Nancy Drew Herself;” quoted by Melanie Rehak, Girl Sleuth (2005)